Olympic lifting shoes… yes or no?

So Far, None of our athletes wear Olys, and very few use lifting belts. I like that we concentrate on our mobility issues and movement patterns, and work on midline stability. We are, after all, working to toward “functional movement” in our everyday lives, and there are not many opportunities to don the Olys outside of the gym.

– Coach Monica

If I had my 'druthers"

If I had my ‘druthers”

From Eric Cressey:

Should You Wear Olympic Lifting Shoes?

If you move well (i.e., have a good squat pattern to below parallel in bare feet), then by all means, feel free to use Olympic lifting shoes for your squatting and Olympic lifting, if it tickles your fancy. After all, it’s only 5-10% of your training volume, most likely. Just make sure to a) only wear them for these exercises, b) maintain the underlying “heel-less” squat pattern, and c) pick the shoes with the smaller heel lift (0.5″ instead of 1.25″). You might also consider wearing more minimalist footwear for the rest of your training sessions to “cancel” the O-lifting shoes out. And, again, if you’re a competitive Olympic lifter, please feel free to rock whatever you want – and crush big weights doing so.

If, however, you’re an athlete in another sport who uses squatting and Olympic lifting as part of your training, I don’t think it’s a useful addition. And, it’s certainly not an appropriate initiative if you are just someone who is looking for a way to work around your poor mobility. Ignoring a fundamental movement flaw – and certainly loading it – will always come back to bite you in the butt.

From Eric Cressey:  “To squat deep, you need to be proficient on a number of fronts, the foremost of which are:

1. You must have sufficient dorsiflexion range of motion (knee over toe ankle mobility).

2. You have to have sufficient hip internal rotation (can be limited by muscular, capsular, alignment, or bony issues).

3. You have to have sufficient hip flexion (can be limited by muscular, capsular, alignment, or bony issues; this typically isn’t much of a problem).

4. You have to have adequate knee flexion (this is rarely an issue; you’d need to have brutally short quads to have an issue here).

5. You need to have adequate core control – specifically anterior core control – to be able to appropriately position the pelvis and lumbar spine. This is especially true if we’re talking about an overhead squat, as it’s harder to resist extension with the arms overhead.

If you move well (i.e., have a good squat pattern to below parallel in bare feet), then by all means, feel free to use Olympic lifting shoes for your squatting and Olympic lifting, if it tickles your fancy. After all, it’s only 5-10% of your training volume, most likely. Just make sure to a) only wear them for these exercises, b) maintain the underlying “heel-less” squat pattern, and c) pick the shoes with the smaller heel lift (0.5″ instead of 1.25″). You might also consider wearing more minimalist footwear for the rest of your training sessions to “cancel” the O-lifting shoes out. And, again, if you’re a competitive Olympic lifter, please feel free to rock whatever you want – and crush big weights doing so.

If, however, you’re an athlete in another sport who uses squatting and Olympic lifting as part of your training, I don’t think it’s a useful addition. And, it’s certainly not an appropriate initiative if you are just someone who is looking for a way to work around your poor mobility. Ignoring a fundamental movement flaw – and certainly loading it – will always come back to bite you in the butt.

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